Trucking Group Demands ‘Justice’ in Wake of Mob Attack on Big Rig in Minneapolis

Minneapolis, MN – A leading trucking group is demanding “justice” after a crowd was caught on video mobbing a big rig in downtown Minneapolis this week.

Only minutes after the announcement of the “guilty” verdicts in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin, a 10 Roads tractor-trailer — a company that hauls U.S. mail — was attacked at the intersection of South 7th Street and S 3rd Ave.




 

It began when a female truck driver attempted to make a left-hand turn, but a crowd of people who had gathered to hear the verdict as it was read, actively impeded the big rig.

The tension quickly escalated from there.

A video journalist on the scene captured almost the entirety of the incident which lasted well over a minute.

Click HERE to read Transportation Nation Network’s full report on the incident.

WATCH the video below.

Now, the Small Business in Transportation Coalition (SBTC) is demanding a full investigation.

In a letter sent on Thursday, April 22, to the United States Postal Service (USPS) Office of the Inspector General (OIG), the SBTC urged “investigate this incident and bring the people who attacked this truck driver to justice.”

“They physically climbed onto the truck, pounded on the windows, verbally attacked the female driver and disconnected the glad hand airline on the truck,” the SBTC wrote. “Fortunately, a video was taken of the incident and the perpetrators of the attack can readily be identified and prosecuted.” 




 

Specifically, the SBTC is calling for the enforcement of 18 U.S.C. Section 1701, which states:

Whoever knowingly and willfully obstructs or retards the passage of the mail, or any carrier or conveyance carrying the mail, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than six months, or both.

It remains unclear if the tractor-trailer was hauling U.S. mail at the time it was accosted.

Here We Go Again

Notably, the 15,000-member group chose to first take its case regarding the latest incident to the USPS-OIG instead of asking Hennepin County authorities to investigate the matter for possible criminal and civil offenses.

Perhaps that’s because Hennepin County prosecutors declined to pursue charges against protesters who committed obvious crimes against semi-tanker Bogdan Vechirko last May.

We all remember what transpired when Vechirko unintentionally drove into a group of thousands of protesters along Interstate 35 in Minneapolis in the wake of George Floyd’s death.

 

Even after reviewing damning video evidence of protesters committing a series of crimes such as assault, battery, and theft — one person even brandished a handgun and pointed it at Vechirko before firing multiple shots and blowing out a front tire on Vechirko’s semi-truck — both local and state officials declined to hold any protesters accountable for their actions.


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Instead, Hennepin County prosecutors later charged Vechirko with a felony count of threats of violence and a gross misdemeanor count of criminal vehicular operation before ultimately reaching an agreement to resolve the charges earlier this year.

Behind the scenes, the SBTC was instrumental in pressuring Hennepin County prosecutors to either drop or resolve the charges.




 

In its letter to the USPS-OIG this week, the SBTC again explained why it’s crucial that law enforcement take appropriate action against those who threaten or place truckers in danger.

“Truck drivers should not be harmed or placed in fear of being attacked by protestors and rioters while simply doing their job,” the group stated. “Fortunately, as far as we can tell the protestors did not break into the truck and gain access to the mail. We were lucky this time.”

TransportationNation.com will continue to follow this story.

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